Unbound: No 177
By Barbara Bickham profile image Barbara Bickham
5 min read

Unbound: No 177

Unbound: No 177 - A discussion on the vulnerability of LLMs to the 'butterfly effect', the slowdown of subscriptions and live service games in 2024, and DigitalPath's AI revolutionizing wildfire detection.

Why LLMs are vulnerable to the ‘butterfly effect’
by Taryn Plumb | VentureBeat.com

Made by Trailyn Ventures with Supermachine Prompt

Prompting is the way we get generative AI and large language models (LLMs) to talk to us. It is an art form in and of itself as we seek to get AI to provide us with ‘accurate’ answers.

But what about variations? If we construct a prompt a certain way, will it change a model’s decision (and impact its accuracy)?

The answer: Yes, according to research from the University of Southern California Information Sciences Institute.

2 Minute Read →


Subscriptions, live service games will slow down in 2024 | Newzoo
by Kyle Melnick | Venturebeat.com

Image Credit: Newzoo

Newzoo today released its Market Trends report for the games industry in 2024, in which it predicts ways in which the industry will change in the coming year. The primary takeaway from this year’s report is that Newzoo believes the industry will become leaner as it stabilizes from 2023’s chaos. It predicts that major trends such as live service games and subscription models will cool off and see lower growth than they have in the past few years.

“After 2023, when the industry faced a series of unfortunate layoffs and many big gaming bets didn’t pay off, this year will be lean for many companies,” say Newzoo’s analysts. “The cash and investments that flooded the market during the pandemic have dried up considerably, and funding massive new projects is no longer a top priority. Games companies will employ risk reduction strategies like avoiding new IPs. Instead, they’ll focus on sequels and leveraging existing IPs.”

2023 was a year of massive acquisitions and many layoffs. Companies “restructured” and canceled projects even as hundreds of games released. Chelsea Blasko, co-CEO of Iron Galaxy, said in the report, “As we begin 2024, we see opportunities to bring some much-needed stability to our industry.”

2 Minute Read →


From Embers to Algorithms: How DigitalPath’s AI is Revolutionizing Wildfire Detection
by Kristen Yee | Nvidia

DigitalPath is igniting change in the Golden State — using computer vision, generative adversarial networks and a network of thousands of cameras to detect signs of fire in real time.

In the latest episode of NVIDIA’s AI Podcast, host Noah Kravtiz spoke with DigitalPath System Architect Ethan Higgins about the company’s role in the ALERTCalifornia initiative, a collaboration between California’s wildfire fighting agency CAL FIRE and the University of California, San Diego.

DigitalPath built computer vision models to process images collected from network cameras — anywhere from 8 million to 16 million a day — intelligently identifying signs of fire like smoke.

3 Minute Read →


🌙 NASA - Best Photo from Last Week
Hubble Sees a Merged Galaxy

This new NASA Hubble Space Telescope image shows ESO 185-IG013, a luminous blue compact galaxy (BCG). BCGs are nearby galaxies that show an intense burst of star formation. They are unusually blue in visible light, which sets them apart from other high-starburst galaxies that emit more infrared light. Astrophysicists study BCGs because they provide a relatively close-by equivalent for galaxies from the early universe. This means that BCGs can help scientists learn about galaxy formation and evolution that may have been happening billions of years ago.

Hubble imaged ESO 185-IG013 in ultraviolet, visible, and infrared wavelengths to reveal details about its past. Hundreds of young star clusters, many of which are younger than 100 million years, populate the galaxy. A large number of star clusters are only 3.5 million years old – relative infants compared to the timescale of our universe. Scientists predict that many of these youngest clusters will not last, since young clusters can often perish after expelling too much of their gas. The large number of young star clusters indicates that this galaxy was part of a recent galaxy collision and merger. The perturbed structure of the galaxy, which likely occurred from the violent interactions of gas and dust during the collision, is another sign. The merger supplied the system with lots of fuel for star formation, which continues to take place today.

ESO 185-IG013 also contains a tidal shell, the diffuse glow surrounding its bright center, which is a common signal of galaxy mergers. Scientists believe that in a galaxy merger, the smaller of the two interacting galaxies gets disrupted by the larger galaxy, losing most of its material. This releases the material, which then gets pulled in again by the gravity of the larger galaxy. The dense area where the material gets repositioned is called the shell, and it contains many star clusters. In addition to the shell, ESO 185-IG013 boasts a tail of gas in the northeast.

All of the stars in the system have a combined mass more than 7 billion times that of our Sun. The system is located about 260 million light-years away.

LEARN MORE:

Hubble’s Cosmic Collisions

Hubble Science: Galaxy Details and Mergers

Hubble Science: Tracing the Growth of Galaxies

Media Contact:

Claire Andreoli
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD
claire.andreoli@nasa.gov


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By Barbara Bickham profile image Barbara Bickham
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