Unbound: No 146
By Barbara Bickham profile image Barbara Bickham
4 min read

Unbound: No 146

Artificial Intelligence — the greatest disruptor ever? by Llewellyn King | NWI.com To rephrase Leon Trotsky: You may not be interested in artificial intelligence, but artificial intelligence is interested in you. Suddenly, long-rumored and awaited, AI is upon the world — a world that isn’t ready for the massive and forever

Artificial Intelligence — the greatest disruptor ever?
by Llewellyn King | NWI.com

Photo by Arseny Togulev on Unsplash

To rephrase Leon Trotsky: You may not be interested in artificial intelligence, but artificial intelligence is interested in you.

Suddenly, long-rumored and awaited, AI is upon the world — a world that isn’t ready for the massive and forever disruption it threatens.

AI could be the greatest disruptor in history, surpassing the arrival of the printing press, the steam engine and electricity. Those all led to good things.

At this time, the long-term effects of AI are just speculative, but they could be terrifying, throwing tens of millions out of work and making a mockery of truth, rendering pictures and printed words unreliable.

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Welcome to the augmented future. Watch it bring you to your knees
by | VentureBeat

Photo by Tobias on Unsplash

Back on New Year’s Day, I wrote a piece for VentureBeat predicting 2023 as the year of mixed reality. On Monday of next week, the world will see why I still believe this is true. That’s the day Apple is expected to unveil its long-awaited mixed reality headset, a product rumored to be called the “Reality Pro” and certain to set the standard for immersive experiences.

This is a big deal.

In fact, I predict that June 5, 2023, will go down in history as the first day of our augmented future — a time when the boundaries between the real world and the digital world start to evaporate from our lives. That’s the goal of mixed reality: To unleash virtual experiences that are merged with our real surroundings, embellishing and enhancing our daily life. With the added power of generative AI, the physical world will quickly become a magical place filled with creative, artistic and informative content that materializes everywhere we go. This is the future of computing.

3 Minute Read →


The golden future of the NFT gaming industry on blockchain

By Andrea Porcelli | The Cryptonomous

Photo by Carl Raw on Unsplash

The global NFT gaming market on blockchain is set for significant growth in the coming years, according to a report published by Grand View Research, a leading market intelligence firm.

Oftentimes, The Cryptonomist has cited the successes of the present in the industry, though Grand View Research’s report is steeped in the glorious future of blockchain gaming.

The report predicts that the market will reach a staggering $301.53 billion by 2030, driven by the transition from traditional gaming to blockchain-based alternatives.

3 Minute Read →


🌙 NASA - Best Photo from Last Week
Hubble Captures a Drifting Galaxy

The jellyfish galaxy JW39 hangs serenely in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This galaxy lies over 900 million light-years away in the constellation Coma Berenices and is one of several jellyfish galaxies Hubble has been studying over the past two years.

Despite this jellyfish galaxy’s serene appearance, it is adrift in a ferociously hostile environment: a galaxy cluster. Compared to their more isolated counterparts, the galaxies in galaxy clusters are often distorted by the gravitational pull of larger neighbors, which can twist galaxies into a variety of shapes. If that was not enough, the space between galaxies in a cluster is also pervaded with a searingly hot plasma known as the intracluster medium. While this plasma is extremely tenuous, galaxies moving through it experience it almost like swimmers fighting against a current, and this interaction can strip galaxies of their star-forming gas.

This interaction between the intracluster medium and the galaxies is called ram-pressure stripping and is the process responsible for the trailing tendrils of this jellyfish galaxy. As JW39 moved through the cluster, the pressure of the intracluster medium stripped away gas and dust into long trailing ribbons of star formation that now stretch away from the disk of the galaxy.

Astronomers using Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 studied these trailing tendrils in detail, as they are a particularly extreme environment for star formation. Surprisingly, they found that star formation in the ‘tentacles’ of jellyfish galaxies was not noticeably different from star formation in the galaxy disk.

Text credit: European Space Agency (ESA)
Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, M. Gullieuszik and the GASP team

Media Contact:
Claire Andreoli
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD
claire.andreoli@nasa.gov

Last Updated: May 26, 2023
Editor: Andrea Gianopoulos


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By Barbara Bickham profile image Barbara Bickham
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