Say Goodbye to Distractions with the Pomodoro Technique Cheat Sheet
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By Barbara Bickham profile image Barbara Bickham
1 min read

Say Goodbye to Distractions with the Pomodoro Technique Cheat Sheet

Are you looking to get more from your day? Want to avoid spending your precious time reading even more books on productivity? You may benefit from the Pomodoro Technique. This method simplifies time and task management with a single, simple tool: a timer. Try this effective step-by-step method for using

Are you looking to get more from your day? Want to avoid spending your precious time reading even more books on productivity? You may benefit from the Pomodoro Technique.

This method simplifies time and task management with a single, simple tool: a timer. Try this effective step-by-step method for using this tool to maximize your productivity.

  1. Choose Your Timer
  • The title, "Pomodoro Technique," is based on the tomato-shaped kitchen timer, but any timer will do. You may benefit from a physical device that you can set and reset manually.
  • Alternately, you may prefer a software application that offers greater automation.

2. Track Your Sessions

  • Use a sticky note, notepad, piece of scratch paper, or your computer.
  • A spreadsheet program such as Excel can work nicely.
  • Use check boxes to track every session that you complete.

3. Set Your Timer for 25 Minutes

  • While the timer is running, work without distractions.
  • A Pomodoro session can be stopped if you must, but it cannot be paused or restarted.
Photo by Ralph Hutter on Unsplash

4. Take A Quick Break

  • When the timer goes off, stop what you're doing and take a break.
  • Your break should last at least 5 minutes, but not much longer.

5. After 4 Sessions, Take a Longer Break

  • When you've completed four successful Pomodoro sessions, take a longer break.
  • Now is a good time for a 30-minute rest.
  • You may find it refreshing to have a snack, meal, or even a short nap to recharge before beginning again.
By Barbara Bickham profile image Barbara Bickham
Updated on
Leadership